TIC Dialogue: Thom Gelardi and Simon Senzon

In this TIC Dialogue, Thom Gelardi and Simon Senzon discuss several chiropractic topics over the course of three hours.  The topics ranged from Thom’s only meeting with B.J. Palmer in the 1950s, his private practice, his mentor, Lyle Sherman, as well as other events of history and politics. The most distinct element of the dialogue is Thom’s unwavering philosophical viewpoint that professions are defined by their mission.

This short clip from the discussion is about the different paradigm, or what Gelardi refers to as missions. The chiropractic mission is distinct. The medical mission too is distinct. Over the course of chiropractic history, there was once a clash between “straights” and “mixers.” Starting in the 1970s, that paradigm clash focused on the role of diagnosis and analysis in chiropractic practice.

To listen to the full dialogue, please become a member of The Institute Chiropractic.

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Comments
  1. Very well written, Dr. Senzon. Working with Dr. Keating for as long as I have, I, too, disagree with what Dr. Perle mentioned about DD’s evolving theories. Those evolved over the entire time from 1895 until his death, not just the last decade of life. It is true that DD did not come up with the phrase vertebral subluxation, Solon Langworthy did, with his compatriots, Oakley Smith and Minora Paxson. As far as the development of the many techniques in our profession, each can point to one of DD’s theories as the philosophical basis of why it focuses on what it does. It was not in Modernized Chiropractic where the term innate intelligience came from, as you rightly stated. With the combined work of Keating, yourself and the rest of us in the field of Chiropractic History, conclusions made by one of us will undoubtedly be reviewed by the rest of us. Chiropractic Philosophy is not a pseudo religion, it helps to explain WHY we do what we do. We do not worship it. Again, your reply was well written and researched.

  2. Great post Dr. Senzon. It seems the harder our profession tries to come together the harder some camps try to prove why there perspective is correct. I to think it is time for some honesty in these discussions.

  3. Thanks for this thoughtful post, great Monday-morning reading.
    The problems in thinking are more serious than the problems in perspective. Many people don’t want to see or consider the other perspective[s] because they know cognitive dissonance waits around the corner. This is evident in today’s national politics where “being right” and defending personal/party dogma is more important than being accurate, cooperative, or solution-oriented.
    There seems to be a growing trend of taking pride in being dumb these days. You only stand a chance of developing 3rd, 4th, 5th person perspective if you are open and willing to do so. As I see it, many on the medipractor end aren’t willing to do this… and I’m sure they’d say the same about me (us).
    Thanks again, keep up the good work.

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